Categories
Allotment Lockwood Podcasts

Urban Farming


 

You don’t need thousands of acres to become a farmer. A windowsill is enough to produce food (just a little) You’ll need more but keep it local, eat what’s best at the season of the year. Don’t use chemicals, there’s lot of better ways.

Categories
cooperative Lockwood

Cooperative

Cooperation

Most of the world assumes it works in a democracy. The word has been much used, and abused, over the years. It was never intended to be for ‘all the people’, even the Greeks only allowed Citizens, about 10% of the people, the right to vote.

Today we are being subsumed by a new power. No longer are nation states in charge of their own destinies (if they ever were). Large business corporations dominate, and control how we will all live – and work. That last word needs explanation. With capitalism the worker is engaged to make a profit for the owner. There is no other relevant reason. The owner has obligations, to suppliers, workers and pays taxes to governments. The taxes are vital to keep the political power elite able to exercise control.

This essay could easily become a critique of capitalism, but that’s to be avoided. The assumption must be that this system no longer serves the population properly. One man started a company in 2004, he now is worth billions, perhaps even trillions, and shows no sign modifying his behaviour.

There are other ways, and I’ll start with my favourite – which is a cooperative (often the network insists on using co-operative) organisation started in 1956 in the Basque region of Spain. One of the attributes of this lovely region is that historically there were three distinct groups of people: Varduli, Caristii and Autrigones.

These groups may have some DNA linkages with the Celts of Scotland and Ireland, but that’s an aside that lacks substantive proof. They are likely to be the oldest Europeans

‘On 14th April 1956, whilst many people of Mondragón were discreetly and rather warily celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Second Republic, Father José María Arizmendiarrieta was blessing the foundation stone of Ulgor, a company with a name which drew together the identity of the founders: Luis Usatorre, Jesús Larrañaga, Alfonso Gorroñogoitia, José María Ormaechea and Javier Ortubay.

They had to wait almost three years until May 1959, as Jesús Larrañaga recalls in the introduction, for the first bylaws of Talleres Ulgor to be approved.

Father Arizmendiarrieta and Ormaechea went on foot from the old building of the Escuela Profesional, today Mondragon Eskola Politeknikoa, to the piece of land known as Laxarte, where they had already bought a plot for 27 euro cents (45 pesetas) per square metre. Ormaechea was in charge of methodically measuring out the plot and a fortnight later building work started on the MONDRAGON Experience’s first production plant: a 750m2 two-storey concrete structure.’

Have a look at the Mondragon story – and get excited. Then we will continue.

https://www.mondragon-corporation.com

Categories
Lockwood Podcasts

Trevor Lockwood

Trevor Lockwood portrait by Lois Cordelia
Trevor Lockwood

When I started Felixstowe Radio in 2005 we rigged up a studio in my front room, and broadcast online. Morag Clark (now Liffen) interviewed me once, probably to fill up air time. This is the recording we made at the time.

Coach Tip by Morag Clarke
Categories
Lockwood personal Podcasts

Days of Joy

Kate
Kate

We sat, nervously, waiting for the big event to happen.

The midwife was a wonderful example of her profession; large-bosoms, with a smile for us both, she oozed confidence. She lived at the other end of the crescent. She was at Oxford, our modest terraced house was at Cambridge Gardens.

It was a blissful day. Now, with the passage of years, it has become idyllic. My wife, Sue, looked radiant if apprehensive. She’d chosen to have the midwife come to our house. It was the right decision. She was relaxed and the midwife was our neighbour.

I was at home. This often felt like a rare event. Newly promoted I wanted to make an impression but really I would grab any opportunity to work overtime. As Sue never worked during those early days of motherhood it was clearly my job to be the bread-winner. I doubled my pay with overtime, often at the most inconvenient times.

Not today. I was at home.

The midwife stood up. ‘I think it’s time we went up upstairs,’ she said, ‘can you make us a cup of tea.’

Nervously I went to the kitchen, and made tea. How long did that take? It seemed like moments.

Racing upstairs with the tea tray I was greeted by the wonderful sight of my new daughter snuggled against my wife’s chest. Magical.

I don’t remember any baby cries. Kate (really Katherine Louise) seemed very content to be in our world, her new world.

Sue had made a crib, covering the wicker-work with soft cloth. New bed linen, all hand-made, waited for the new occupant.

What can you say when looking at your newly-born child? It’s a miracle of nature. Sue was exhausted but radiant.

Eventually it was decided to let Kate go to sleep. What a moment to remember as I picked up this precious bundle and lowered her into the crib. Her small hand grasped mine. Absolute perfection.

Categories
Lockwood Podcasts Suffolk

Phoebe Lockwood

Recording by George Ewart Evans of Phoebe Lockwood

http://sounds.bl.uk/embed/Oral-history/George-Ewart-Evans-collection/021M-T1418WXXXXXX-0700V0

Phoebe Lockwood talks about her life

http://sounds.bl.uk/embed/Oral-history/George-Ewart-Evans-collection/021M-T1453WXXXXXX-0300V0

Phoebe tells about cooking hares.

http://sounds.bl.uk/embed/Oral-history/George-Ewart-Evans-collection/021M-T1447RXXXXXX-0700V0

http://sounds.bl.uk/embed/Oral-history/George-Ewart-Evans-collection/021M-T1447RXXXXXX-0900V0

Suffolk riddles